Get Involved

You Can Make a Difference

Volunteers Serving Food

Volunteer Your Time

Community input is vital to our success.

Our investigators are supported by a community advisory board (CAB) made up of representatives from community-based organizations, neighborhood associations, universities, government agencies, and, most importantly. the people living with and affected by HIV.


We look to the community for input and advice at every stage of the research process. In addition to attending monthly meetings, CAB members serve on committees to help develop and guide ocommunity engagement activities.

Heart & Hands

Make a Donation

The Collaboratory of investigators at defeatHIV is grateful to be supported by the National Institutes of Health’s Martin Delaney Collaboratory, which was created to encourage public-private partnerships and their efforts at eradicating HIV.  We agree that these partnerships can help translate cutting edge science into feasible real-world therapies, and we have assembled a world class team aimed at doing just that.

Due to confidence in our ability to push the limits of curative HIV therapies, we are currently one of only 6 groups in the nation to have received this prestigious funding award.  With groundbreaking projects underway, we hope to sustain this momentum and strengthen our Collaboratory by establishing new partnerships in both the public and private sectors.

If you would like to learn more about our efforts and how you can directly make an impact, please contact us.

What We Are Up Against

HIV and AIDS continue to be devastating health problems in the United States and worldwide. There were approximately 38 million people across the globe with HIV/AIDS in 2019. Of these, 36.2 million were adults and 1.8 million were children (<15 years old).
As of the end of 2019, 25.4 million people with HIV (67%) were accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally. That means 12.6 million people are still waiting. 
Lifelong treatment poses financial, logistical, health and psychosocial challenges. A safe, effective, scalable and cost-effective intervention that is fully curative or that allows for a sustained period of virus control in the absence of any therapy would help to end HIV everywhere.
Urgent development of a proof-of-concept HIV cure is needed, regardless of immediate global applicability.