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WEBINARS

 

GENE THERAPY IN A BOX

Working Towards a Brighter Future

defeatHIV educational webinar with Dr. Jennifer Adair, who talks about her research into a portable machine-- 'gene therapy in a box'-- that could make future cancer & HIV cures affordable in developing countries.

This tabletop device that enables medical staff to genetically manipulate a patient’s blood to deliver potential new therapies for cancer, HIV and other diseases would eliminate the need for multimillion-dollar “clean rooms,” making gene therapy more possible for even the poorest of countries.

clean rooms and requires less than half the staff, according to a study published in Nature Communications.

The adapted cells also successful repopulated the blood system when tested in two different animal models, the study noted.

It hasn’t yet been tested in humans.


This video was recorded on February 17, 2016 at Fred Hutch.

 

A GLASS HALF FULL - IAS VERSION

CHANGING ATTITUDES AND VALUES TO ACHIEVE AN HIV CURE

The opening presentation from community delivered by defeatHIV's community engagement project manager as it appeared at "Pathways to an HIV Cure: Tools for Clinicians and Community", a virtual pre-conference offering before AIDS 2020 Virtual on July 1, 2020.

 

HOPE, HYPE & REALITY

Sangamo Talks about Zinc Fingers & Gene Therapy Studies to Control or Cure HIV

A video to answer your questions about a gene therapy approach to an HIV cure.


On Nov 5, 2014, the defeatHIV Community Advisory Board hosted a talk with Dr. Philip D. Gregory (Chief Scientific Officer, Sangamo Biosciences) about the groundbreaking clinical studies of his company’s zinc finger nuclease (ZFN)-based genome editing technology in people.


Data from their studies, carried out in people living with HIV, demonstrate that the T-cell genome can be safely engineered to mimic a naturally occurring mutation that provides resistance to HIV infection.


ZFN-modified T-cells are well tolerated when re-infused and treatment is associated with decreased viral loads in several participants who were taken off their antiretroviral therapy -- including one whose viral load became undetectable!

 

HIV-RESISTANT ANTI-HIV CAR T CELLS

Thor Wagner talks with the defeatHIV CAB about our collaboratory's 1st Initial Research Focus--which is creating HIV-resistant CAR T cells engineered to seek out the cells infected with HIV and kill them.

 

HIV AMONG AMERICAN INDIANS & ALASKA NATIVES / UNDERSTANDING HIV CURE RESEARCH

A webinar offered for National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, which was observed on March 20, 2017. #NNHAAD


The defeatHIV Community Advisory Board partnered for this webinar with the Urban Indian Health Institute, a division of Seattle Indian Health Board, which was followed by a live event in Seattle that drew 56 people.


Bill Hall -Tlingit, Raven Clan (Southeastern Alaska) / defeatHIV CAB member

Abigail Echohawk - enrolled member of the Kitkehahki band of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma & Upper Athabascan people of Mentasta Village, Alaska / UIHI Director


Leah Dodge - enrolled member of the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians / UIHI Epidemiologist


Smitty Buckler - unenrolled member of the Choctaw Tribe / defeatHIV CAB member


Michael Louella - defeatHIV CAB coordinator

 

Una breve introducción en español a la investigación cura del VIH

 

Delaney Cell & Genome Engineering Initiative

Introduction to the first version of defeatHIV

The defeatHIV Community Advisory Board (CAB) recorded its first webinar on November 18, 2013, which served as an introduction to the collaboratory and the two men who lead our research group.


We give here an overview of our research that we hope will one day lead to a cure for HIV that is accessible to all who need it everywhere on this earth.

In short, through our research, we hope one day to make your immune cells resistant to HIV and repopulate your immune system with these newly resistant cells.


And then we hope to snip out the HIV that has fuses into your DNA and makes a lifetime of medicines the current fate of every HIV+ person.


We hope to do this with special enzymes we've created from bread yeast that can target specific areas in our genes.

 
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